Readings, Events, News

December 2nd, 2018

William Corbett: October 11, 1942–August 10, 2018
Pressed Wafer’s publisher and editor has died after a year-long battle with cancer. The tributes include the following:

Behrle, Jim. “‘Wherever He Was Felt Like The Center Of The Universe’: Writers Remember Poet William Corbett.” WBUR’s The ARTery. 17 August 2018.

Cole, Sean and Deborah Becker. “‘Every Day Is Poetry Day’ — Remembering William Corbett.” WBUR’s Radio Boston. 17 August 2018.

Eds., The Chicago Review. “William Corbett (1942–2018).” 29 August 2018.

Howe, Fanny. “Remembrance: William Corbett — A Poet of Landscape, Weather, and Consciousness.” the arts fuse. 16 August 2018.

Marquard, Bryan. “William Corbett, 75, poet whose South End home became a literary salon.” Boston Globe. 18 August 2018.

Mir, Stan. “Recollections of William Corbett.” Hyperallergic. 2 September 2018.

Slocum, Sarah Whiteside. “In memory of William Corbett.” The Tech. 22 August 2018.

The Newest Books

Reviews

Band of Thebes calls Jonathan Strong’s Quit the Race a “[p]iercing study of a longterm gay couple by an American master.” See for yourself here.

The Times Literary Supplement has included The Atropastorals by Douglas Crase as a 2017 Book of the Year! Mark Ford writes “The Astropastorals is a slim pamphlet that collects the handful of lyrics the American poet Douglas Crase has deemed fit for publication in the three-and-a-half decades since his astonishing debut, The Revisionist of 1981. Although it runs to only eighteen pages, it packs a powerful punch. Crase is the master of complex, sinuous sentences that twist and loop and unfurl in the most unpredictable of ways—indeed navigating his poetic idiom can feel a bit like riding the rapids. The title poem in particular succeeds in conjugating the mysteries of our planetary existence with an eloquence and sweep I found at once dizzying and uplifting.”

A profile of Pressed Wafer’s George Scialabba, “One of America’s best all-round intellects” in Harvard Magazine.

Christopher Schaeffer on Mark Lamoureux’s 29 Cheeseburgers + 39 Years: Mark Lamoureux […] is up to something a little different. [T]he book embraces a messiness and excess that emphasizes how desperate an attempt to shore up a material phenomenology of memory rather than offering a sack full of childhood ephemera as a totalizing, all-encompassing museum of epiphanies. It’s funny and sad, but neither funny nor sad in the ways that the premise and the bold, two-tone creamsicle colored cover led me to expect. Read the whole review at the VOLTA blog.